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Sanding before carving?

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  • #100006220
    NausetWoodNausetWood
    Participant

    I find it easier to layout a pattern onto the wood if I sand with 220grit first. The basswood blanks I used are somewhat rough for my liking. Does anyone else find this necessary?

    #100006229
    Marty LeenhoutsMarty Leenhouts
    Keymaster

    HI Steve,
    I use the Pattern Transfer Tool for all pattern application and sanding nice and smooth before application makes a big difference.
    Same is true when tracing over graphite transfer paper or drawing directly on the wood.
    So I sure to agree with you on this!
    Marty

    #100007086
    AvatarAeroclassics
    Participant

    There is a fellow who sells Basswood, Butternut and other woods under the name of Uncle Al. That is the smoothest material I have ever laid eyes on and would not need any sort of sanding prior to use. I know we carry it at the Woodcraft in Plano, TX. So other Woodcraft stores might also carry it.

    Doug

    #100007089
    Marty LeenhoutsMarty Leenhouts
    Keymaster

    I’ll leave Doug’s post but know that the basswood I sell in the MyChipCarving Store is always clear, clean and creamy white.

    It comes from NW Wisconsin which is prime basswood country. Always northern grown.

    It needs a bit of sanding with 220 grit but that’s about all.

    #100007092
    AvatarAeroclassics
    Participant

    Marty,

    I am certain the you sell a high quality product, it was not my intent to disparage your products in any way. Just remarking that his are the smoothest I have seen. That statement should be qualified by saying I have not seen yours as of yet.

    Doug

    #100007857
    AvatarFrederick
    Participant

    I’m new at chip carving but I’m a pretty decent woodworker. So I’m fluent in using hand tools. I do not sand the carving boards. I plane them by hand, using a #4 finishing plane set to a cutting depth of about 0.002″. The resulting surface is very smooth. Then I transfer the pattern or draw my own.

    After the carving is done, I use the same #4 to remove the pattern marks. Depending on what I’ve carved (eg, a swirl rosette), I have to be careful not to flatten the sharp edges of my carving. But this method seems to work well for me.

    Is there a down side to the way Im doing this?

    Fred

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by AvatarFrederick.
    #100007882
    Marty LeenhoutsMarty Leenhouts
    Keymaster

    Hello Fred! Smoothing the basswood surface with a finishing plane is a fantastic way to get a smooth, flat surface.

    You won’t hear me mention this method because most chip carvers cannot use a plane or scraper effectively to get the results you do.

    Removing leftover pattern lines in the same way would be quite challenging especially if quite a lot of the surface has been carved.

    From your post you know that we don’t want to flatten the tops of the sharp ridges. I recommend using a Tombow Sand Eraser to remove any leftover pattern lines.

    They do the trick and break down as they remove the lines so they don’t affect the carving.

    #100007907
    AvatarFrederick
    Participant

    Thank you Marty. I will go get one. I appreciate your advice.

    Also, the lazy susan is sheer genius Sir!

    Fred

    #100008216
    AvatarFrederick
    Participant

    Marty, the eraser you recommended works great! Thanks for that tip!

    Fred

    #100008218
    AvatarClyde Fosdyke
    Participant

    In order to avoid possibility of grit getting on board and damaging blade edge would you recommend something like “Abranet” in 220 grit instead of sandpaper?

    #100008236
    Marty LeenhoutsMarty Leenhouts
    Keymaster

    Glad you found the Tombow Eraser to be the best when it comes to removing left over pattern lines!

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