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Letters & Pattern Swiss Pine Wood

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  • #100008445
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    This Swiss Pine Woods boards are about 180 x 400 mm. The font’s name is “Manuskript Gotisch”. The text “Großer Gott” is from a epigraph carved outside an old house nearby.

     

    #100008446
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    #100008447
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    #100008450
    Marty LeenhoutsMarty Leenhouts
    Keymaster

    Norbert, Thanks for sharing with us.

    Do you find hard spots in your pine boards?

    #100008452
    AvatarShereecox
    Participant

    Beautiful workmanship!

    #100008454
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    Your welcome, Marty!

    Yes, there are really many hard spots in the Swiss Pine Wood, also known as Arolla Pine, or Latin “Pinus Cembra”. It’s a special type of alpine pine with a very typical smell/scent too.

    #100008455
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    Thank you, Shereecox!

     

    #100008628
    Andrei GotiaAndrei Gotia
    Participant

    Very beautiful! Vielen Dank! I like the integrated knots.

    #100008919
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    I brought myself and the knife somehow at the edge of my current chip carving skills with this letters size in Swiss Pine Wood. The lowercases are ca. 11,5 cm in height. The cuts are quite deep. The board is ca. 95 cm long and will be placed at the outside of a cottage—it reads the cottage’s name. That’s my very first commissioned work in chip carving! 😉

    By the way … according to Wikipedia the Swiss Pine Wood or Arve, Zirbe (Latin “Pinus Cembra”) only grows in the Alps up to the timberline and on some spots in the Carpathian Mountains. It’s scent is really very pleasant and it’s pure joy to carve this wood. Okay, the hard spots are very hard. Brittle even.

    Hope you enjoy.

    Take care everybody.

     

    #100008920
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    #100008954
    Marty LeenhoutsMarty Leenhouts
    Keymaster

    Excellent lettering, Norbert!

    The Pfeil knife is similar to the knife I first started with 35 years ago. Now it is called Lamp but at the time the Swiss knife had a different name, K…something? You’ll probably know it 🙂

    Always enjoy your posts!!

     

    #100012064
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    Thank you very much, Marty! I really appreciate your compliments.

    Sorry, I’m a little late with my response.

    Your starter knife “K… something” was a “Klötzli #2”? The forger/cutler Ernst-Ulrich Klötzli (1911–1975) designed this shape together with the master chip carver Christian Rubi (1899–1990). It is still in production and available since the 1950s until today. I just purchased some the other day.

    Do you mind if I post a picture? (I don’t want to compete with your fabulous knives on your own website.)

     

    #100012068
    Marty LeenhoutsMarty Leenhouts
    Keymaster

    Norbert, Yes, Klotzli! It all comes back to me now. Posting your picture is just fine.

    I have a Chip Carving book by Christian Rubi on my shelf :-).

    And…I’ll mention this for the first time right here. Many of the patterns in Christian Rubi’s book, published in 1959, are the same patterns found in books published by a popular US chip carver. The reason I mention this is to show that these patterns and others have been passed down from generations. I’m sure Christian saw them on old pieces that were chip carved before him. When we talk about “giving credit” to someone for their pattern, it may not be their pattern at all. If I get an idea for a pattern, I’ll mention it to show where the inspiration came from. But claiming a pattern as “mine” is not realistic, humble, or legal. Anyone is free to use anyone else’s pattern to carve whatever they like. Patterns cannot be copyrighted for personal use. Copyright only applies to resale.  Your comments are welcome.

    #100012156
    Norbert RiediNorbert Riedi
    Participant

    I agree a 100 percent! Especially with everything that is clearly a geometrical pattern. Will say, a mix of circles/parts of them with other forms such as squares and rectangles, line-cuts between the raw forms etc. etc. There are myriads of combinations possible. And if you just cut one piece more or less you’ll get a different look. If you compare the pattern such as the lower right in your picture from Rubi’s book with some parts in my last picture posted, yes, it looks the same. Or similar. But different. And yes, you will find this very pattern all over the world in all different cultures where humans cut in wood, horn, stone, even metals.

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